Ink Illustration Of Carole Lombard

I love the beautiful women of the 1930’s silver screen. Rita Hayworth, Greta Garbo, Fay Wray. These ladies looked stunning and I love to sketch their publicity shots using different media.

Carole Lombard, in particular, I find hypnotic. Those eyes.

So here I’ve had a bash at a quick ink drawing. I’ve taken some liberties with the hair.

For the eyes (crucial to get those spot on) I started with two large dots for the pupils and built around them. Essential to place the eyes correct in the head and get the right amount of white space around them.

Carole Lombard. Velocity Sketcher. Corel Painter 2017. Click for larger version.

Corel Painter X3 crashes with Mac OS Sierra 10.12

I’ve recently updated the OS on my iMac to Sierra. The version is 10.12

Annoyingly it seems there’s an issue with Corel Painter X3 running against this OS. Admittedly there’s only one scenario I’ve found where the application crashes, but it’s still pretty maddening.

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There doesn’t appear to be any rhyme or reason why the brush sizer should remain static even when I’ve selected it and continued to draw. But occasionally this happens. If I then try to resize the current brush again, the application quits.

I’d certainly welcome a fix to this but my guess is that Corel are motoring forward with newer versions of Painter.

I’d also welcome any ideas for a workaround should the sizing bar remain in place.

Pencil sketch of Roald Dahl’s BFG using Corel Painter X3

This image was drawn using the Velocity Sketcher and a 6B Pencil in Corel’s Painter X3.
I’m using a Wacom Cintiq.

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It’s becoming more important to me to create art digitally that I’m comfortable creating using traditional media. I’m not much of a painter so have reverted back to ink and pencils.

Corel Painter does of course allow me to experiment and make mistakes. But there’s something enormously satisfying about sticking to basic pen and pencil.

Concept art for a children’s picture book about a pet dinosaur

I’m currently working with a children’s author to bring a fantastic story about a young boy and his pet Tyrannosaur to life. I’ve used Mischief to form the concepts and Corel Painter to produce the finished work.

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Book cover concept drawn with Corel Painter

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Concepts created using Mischief

I think it’s fair to say that some of those pieces won’t feature :) Great fun creating them though.

I used the T-Rex from Jurassic Park as reference for the more detailed / less cartoon-like shots. I guess if you’re going to have a dinosaur as a pet you really should have the most fearsome of all!

We’re hoping to have the work completed and self-published for christmas.

A self-published children’s picture book about a frog

Wow, it’s two years since I self-published my first picture book for children about a frog named Bob. The book was indeed titled A Frog Named Bob.

A Frog Named Bob

A Frog Named Bob

I remember vividly sitting in my local cafe (and second home) and coming up with the idea of drawing a series of pictures about a frog who had no idea what sound he should make. His name was Bob and he’d be the most miserable frog that ever lived.

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Sat sketching in the cafe

All that Bob wanted was to be able to make his own sound. The birds chirped, the owl twit-wooed, the bear growled, the mice squeaked, the cows mooed, so on and so forth. But Bob, well he had no clue what sound he should make. So he set forth to discover.

 

When I came up with the idea I knew that the words in the story would need to present me with an opportunity to create some fun and colourful cartoons.

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I looked around at popular children’s picture books and found that rhyming was a key feature.
Julia Donaldson’s Gruffalo was obviously riding high in the charts for children’s picture books so I pored over it and took some notes.
Sure enough the rhyming was cool and great to read aloud.

I made the decision right there to create a rhyming picture book that would be colourful and fun. I’d also aim it at very young readers who enjoy a fun story before bed.

At the time I was using an iPad with the wonderful Procreate app installed. I also had a Wacom Intuos Stylus so creating cool concept sketches whilst enjoying a coffee in town was pretty straight forward.

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With a bit of research into writing for children I found that 32 pages and around 600 – 700 words was the ideal for a picture book. So I set to work.

At home I have a Wacom Cintiq 22HD Touch running with an iMac. A dream combo and coupled with Corel’s Painter X3 I was able to transfer sketches produced in Procreate to the iMac to create something a little more polished.

Before long I had a manuscript and a bunch of rough sketches.
A week or so later (and several nights of little sleep) I had a complete portfolio of artwork for the book.

I self-published using Amazon’s Createspace service. Within a week or two of placing the order I had a box of brand new picture books that I could distribute around the local book stores.

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Proudly holding my first two picture books

I’ve had several reviews about A Frog Named Bob that have all thus far been very positive. From reluctant young talkers finding their voice to hyperactive children settling down for a good giggle right before bed.

The success of A Frog Named Bob encouraged me to continue writing, drawing and self-publishing. Something that I’ve been doing ever since.

You can see my list of books on my dedicated page – my picture books for children.